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Giving Medication: How to Make it Fun for Your Child with Special Needs – Video

Alethea Mshar
Special needs mom and Blogger
01/20/17  1:32 PM PST

A child with disability may require multiple medications to manage his condition. Getting your child to take them can be a challenge. Alethea Mshar has found a clever way to deliver medicines (with a delivery truck, of course!) to her son with Down syndrome.

If you are giving medications to your child, you won’t want to miss this video!

 

 

More Ideas to Help the Medicine Go Down

  1. Let him practice on a “friend.” Demonstrate what you’re about to do on a favorite toy or doll and then let your child try it. If Teddy can handle the procedure, then maybe he can too!
  2. Enlist his help. Sometimes letting your child have some control over the situation can make things easier. Allow him to hold something or be in charge of an important task, like washing his hands.
  3. Give options. Ask your child if he wants to take his medicine with a dropper or a syringe, for example. Making it his decision may reduce the struggle.
  4. Provide a distraction. Give your child a toy, turn on his favorite cartoon or talk about a special place he wants to go.
  5. Reward good behavior. This doesn’t have to be extravagant. A simple, “Good job!” or a high five can make a big difference.

 

Basic Tips on Giving Medication to Children

How to Give Liquid Medication to Your Child:

  1. Measure out the correct amount of liquid medication into a dropper or syringe.
  2. Make sure your child is sitting up.
  3. If your child is old enough, explain what you are about to do.
  4. If he is old enough to hold the dropper/syringe himself, try letting him do it.
  5. Help your child position the dropper/syringe behind his teeth.
  6. Slowly push the plunger toward the inside of his cheek. Avoid injecting liquid toward the back of his throat to prevent choking.
  7. Reward your child with positive feedback such as, “Good job!”

 

How to Give Liquid Medication to an Uncooperative Child:

Sometimes a child may be resistant to taking meds that are essential. In this case you may need 2 adults.

  1. If your child is old enough, explain what you are about to do.
  2. Instruct the second adult to hold the child upright on his lap and gently secure the child’s head.
  3. Use one hand to hold the syringe.
  4. With your other hand, gently open your child’s mouth by gently pushing down on his chin.
  5. Place the syringe behind his teeth and gently push the plunger toward his cheek. Avoid injecting liquid toward the back of his throat to prevent choking.
  6. Reward your child with positive feedback such as, “Good job!”

Source: Seattle Children’s Hospital 

 

More Resources on Medications and Children with Special Needs:

Autism Speaks: My Kid Won’t Swallow Meds

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles: Nine Stress-Free Tips for Giving Your Child Medicine

 

More Articles on Children with Special Needs:

Six Ways to Reduce Stress in Your Child with Special Needs

Support for Families of Children with Special Needs

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